A B C D E F GH I J K LM N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Banana : Bananas are loaded with potassium which is so beneficial to our health. Studies clearly show that if you get twice as much potassium in your diet as sodium, you decrease the risk of dying of heart disease by 50%. Unfortunately, for most people in India and most

people in the West, that ratio is reversed, they get twice as much sodium as potassium because of all the salty foods, packaged foods, etc. Bananas also help fight fa-tigue and insomnia, and high in fiber to keep the digestive tract healthier. For these reasons bananas are a great way to cut sugar cravings for unhealthy and fattening deserts. Potassium is important as well for kidney health and for preventing kidney cancer. Getting enough potassium also means your body is less likely to lose the valuable calcium via urination.


Barley : Barley is loaded with calcium, iron and protein. Whole sprouted barley has twice as many nutrients. Barley is a great source of B1 (thiamin), B3 (niacin), many minerals and is especially rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, which are carotenoids related to vitamin A, and

both help to protect your eyesight and promote your eye health in general. Barley contains a cholesterol-fighting type of soluble fiber called beta-glucan which can also raise immunity as well as insoluble fiber which acts like a “broom” in the body. Both soluble and insoluble types of fiber are, therefore, important for us in different ways. Use unpearled barley when available.


Basil leaves : Basil is not only the key ingredient in pesto, but is also a powerhouse of nutrients. One serving of basil can provide you with your entire day’s recommended daily dose of vitamin K, which is little-talked-about, yet actually extremely important vitamin for

heart & bone health. Vitamin K is vital for signaling to the body “calcify bones, but not arteries”. Without vitamin K calcium can be deposited into the arteries, causing hardening of the arteries and heart attacks, instead of being deposited into the bones which is where we need the calcium! Basil is a great source of eye-health-promoting vitamin A and has anti-inflammatory properties. It contains practically every essential mineral with almost 10% of the recommended daily dose of bone-friendly calcium & magnesium, manganese, copper and iron, as well as heart-friendly potassium, phosphorus, zinc, etc. Basil is rich in flavonoid antioxidants, which help protect our cell structure from damage. Because of its high antioxidant content, basil has a high ORAC score. ORAC is a score used to compare foods which are rich in antioxidants which, in our bodies, destroy excess free radicals, one of the causes of premature aging, heart disease, cancer, inflammation, arthritis, osteoporosis, wrinkles, DNA damage (from pollution, toxic exposures, diet, etc.) and other health challenges. All this, from a little green leaf…


Brown Basmati Rice: Brown basmati is much better for you than white basmati since the bran of this rice is intact. Bran is usually removed in white rice to make it look nicer but that’s where much of rice’s nutrition lies! Bran is important as it’s rich in fiber,

protein, EFA’s, vitamins and minerals. Using brown and red rice instead of white rice is one good strategy for losing extra weight and preventing diabetes.


Bean Sprouts: These immune-system boosting low-calorie sprouts are loaded with protein, vitamin C, B-vitamins and many minerals. It’s also very rich in vitamin K1, which is converted in our bodies into vitamin K2, a very important vitamin for heart health which many

people don’t get enough of. K2 is vital for signaling to the body “calcify bones, but not arteries”. Without vitamin K2 calcium can be deposited into the arteries causing plaque formation (arterial calcification) and leading to heart disease, instead of being deposited into the bones which need the calcium! K2 is, therefore, important for healthy bones too.


Bengal Gram – see Chana Dal:
Beets: Beets are not only a sweet and delicious vegetable, but also contains most of the components of the B-vitamin family as well as fiber, vitamin C, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and other nutrients.

Bell Peppers: Loaded with vitamin C, green, red or yellow bell peppers also have many B-vitamins

Bilberry (Wild Blueberry): This smaller-size wild-crafted relative of blueberry and cranberry is very difficult to grow as a result bilberries are hard to obtain. Yet this berry’s many incredible anti-aging, anti-oxidant and health-giving qualities make the “hunt” for this pleasantly

sour berry well worth it. Their beautiful rich dark pigment is evenly distributed throughout the entire berry, rather than concentrated in the skin, as is the case with blueberries. The significantly higher concentrations of these darker pigments in bilberries are actually the exact reason why they have much more of the powerful antioxidants than blueberries. Famous for being able to improve night-time vision the overall eye health, bilberries are also loaded with powerful antioxidants such as flavonoids, anthocyanins, plant polyphenols, ellagic acid and other highly beneficial phytonutrients. These are all well-known anti-aging and cancer-preventing compounds which also have heart-health benefits such as improving overall circulation, naturally preventing the formation of blood clots, strengthening of blood capillaries and arteries and even reduce the risk of varicose veins. Being so rich in antioxidants, bilberries have a very high ORAC score, more than 200% higher than both blueberries and raspberries. This score is used to compare foods which are rich in antioxidants which, in our bodies, scavenge and destroy excess free radicals, one of the causes of premature aging, heart disease, cancer, inflammation, arthritis, osteoporosis, wrinkles, DNA damage (from pollution, toxic exposures, diet, etc.) and other health challenges. Bilberries also contain a number of other remarkable compounds such resveratrol (what makes drinking red wine so beneficial), antioxidant vitamins C and E and even compounds which prevent recurrent urinary tract infections, ssomething bilberry’s “cousin” cranberries are also famous for. Another powerful natural beneficial compound found in bilberries, called pterostilbene, has also been shown in studies to reduce the risk of colon cancer, naturally reduce cholesterol levels and even lead to memory improvements, according to a Tufts University study. Black Currant Berry: Black currants are a very small, unforgettably tasty, flavorful and pleasantly sour deep-purple (almost black) berry originating in Tibet. Its health benefits are truly incredible. It ranks very high in antioxidants like flavonoids, quercetin, phytonutrients, myricetin and many others. These antioxidants have a proven ability to fight free radicals in our bodies that can cause premature aging, heart disease, inflammation and DNA damage which can lead to cell mutations which can lead to cancer. Black currants are also very high in antioxidant vitamins C and A. All these antioxidants can greatly contribute to heart health because they decrease the oxidation of LDL (the “bad”) cholesterol which is one of the processes causing the formation of atherosclerotic plaque in the arteries, also referred to as “clogged arteries” in the common vernacular. These antioxidants can also help to naturally prevent the formation of blood clots, strengthening of blood capillaries and arteries and even reduce the risk of varicose veins. Furthermore, unlike most berries, black currants are rich in essential fatty acids (EFAs) including ALA, GLA and Omega 3. These EFAs help to reduce cholesterol levels, prevent plaque in the arteries and help to naturally lower blood pressure (or keep blood pressure at normal levels) according to the University of Maryland Medical Center (US). Additionally, consumption of GLA can hinder the growth of “Her-2/ neu”, which is a cancer gene responsible for nearly 30% of all breast cancers, according to the Evanston Northwestern Healthcare Research Institute (US). For women there’s an additional benefit – black currents provide these benefits without increasing estrogen levels as elevated estrogen levels can be a cancer risk for certain women susceptible to breast cancer. Black currants also exhibit anti-inflammatory properties which have been documented for decades. All well-documented in clinical studies. Noting also that black currants are very rich in iron and heart-friendly potassium, we can clearly see what a powerful little dark-purple berry from Tibet it is!


Black-Eyed Peas (lobia), soaked: Contain a good amount of protein, fiber and vitamin B9 (folate). Also contains potassium, which is so important for the proper functioning of every cell in our bodies and is critical for the proper functioning of our heart and other muscles.

It’s also a good source of other minerals such as manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, copper and iron. Soaking black-eyed peas for many hours makes them a lot more bioavailable and increases their nutritional content.


Black-Eyed Peas (sprouted): Rich in protein, fiber and B-vitamins. Sprouting makes black-eyed peas (lobia) even more nutritious and the nutrients much more bioavailable (easier assimilated by our bodies). Sprouting further increases the protein and B-group

vitamin content of black-eyed peas. Also contains potassium, so important for the proper functioning of every cell in our bodies and is critical for the proper func-tioning of our heart and other muscles. It’s also a good source of other minerals such as manganese, magnesi-um, phosphorus, copper and iron.


Black-Eyed Peas (lobia or chawalie): Contain a good amount of protein, fiber and vitamin B9 (folic acid). Also contains potassium, which is so important for the proper functioning of every cell in our bodies and is critical for the proper functioning of our

heart and other muscles. It’s also a good source of other minerals such as manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, copper and iron. Soaking black-eyed peas for many hours makes them a lot more bioavailable and increases their nutritional content.


Blueberry : Blueberries are not just delicious but considered one the healthiest foods in the world and bursting with nutrients! The only problem is that not only are blueberries hard to find here, they’re heavily sprayed with harmful pesticides which are impossible to

remove by washing the berries. These blueberries, on the other hand, have passed strict quality control which includes testing for chemicals and microbiological contaminants, so enjoy all the benefits without worrying! Blueberries score very high on the ORAC scale & have more polyphenol-type antioxidants than any other fruit in the world. ORAC is a score used to compare foods which are rich in antioxidants which in our bodies destroy excess free radicals, one of the causes of premature aging, heart disease, cancer, inflammation, arthritis, osteoporosis, wrinkles, DNA damage (from pollution, toxic exposures, diet, etc.) and other health challenges. Blueberries are very rich in antioxidants and phytonutrients like anthocyanins, ellagic acid, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin A and also B-vitamins, copper, selenium, manganese, zinc, dietary fiber and iron. Clinical studies show that blueberries can significantly improve both the learning capacity and memory, protect the brain from oxidative stress and slow down the aging process and help prevent and counter cancer, heart disease and other age-related diseases.


Bok Choy Greens, steamed (Chinese Cabbage or Pak Choi): It’s always important to consume a large variety of vegetables in your diet so look for a rainbow of colors in your veggies to keep yourself healthy as different color vegetables are a good

visual indication of the large variety of important nutrients contained in each one. Bok choi is high in vitamin A, vitamin C and vitamin K.


Bottle Gourd (Calabash): A source of iron, fiber, iron and trace minerals. Bottle gourd has a very high water content (and is thus very low in calories). It’s gentle on your stomach and aids in digestion.
Broccoli: Broccoli means “cabbage sprout” in Italian. Broccoli is rich in vitamin A, iron, folic acid (vitamin B9/folate), heart-friendly vitamin K and vitamin B2 (riboflavin). Ounce for ounce, broccoli has more vitamin C than an orange and as much calcium as

a glass of milk. Broccoli is also one of the richest sources of beta-carotene in the produce section. Broccoli is also very rich in antioxidants and anti-cancer compounds. Some researchers think that women in Japan have a significantly lower incidence of breast cancer rates because their diets are high in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables. It is available throughout the year. It also contains powerful immunity enhancing compounds.


Broccoli sprouts: Broccoli sprouts are even richer in some nutrients than broccoli itself and a powerful antioxidant and a great detox ingredient. There’s a compound in broccoli sprouts which inhibits cancer cells, a new area of study in cancer research.

Broccoli sprouts also have benefits on healthy digestion and helping to inhibit the growth of some forms of harmful intestinal bacteria. Broccoli sprouts can also combat inflammation throughout the body and helps to support “good” hormones while working against destructive ones. It also helps to maintain a healthier cardiovascular system, combats high blood pressure and supports healthier cholesterol levels, as shown in a well-known Japanese clinical study. Broccoli sprouts also help combat allergies and asthma. A glass of broccoli sprout juice is one of the healthiest things your body can have. Women (and men) who eat at least 1 cup a day of cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, broccoli sprouts, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, mustard greens, cabbage, or kale (or their juice) are more likely to live longer and less likely to have their cancer come back. By about five years after their cancer diagnosis, the top 20% of those who ate an average of 1 cup (150 grams) of cruciferous veggies a day were 42% less likely to have died from breast can-cer and 58% less likely to die from any cause compared to those in the bottom 20%. Cruciferous vegetables contain high amounts of compounds called glucosinolates. When eaten, they convert to other compounds called isothiocyanates and indoles that have been shown to have many anti-cancer properties against a wide range of cancers. Furthermore, 2 very powerful phytonutrients, glutathione and sulforaphane, both of which are rare in food in large quantities, are found in large quantities in broccoli sprouts. According to a highly respected British medical journal Lancet, a 2005 study found strong evidence that consuming broccoli sprouts and other cruciferous vegetables have a protective affect against lung cancer and the unusually high content of sulforaphane and other phytonutrients is the probable reason for that.




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